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Kent County Month in Review August 21

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Tuesday, August 31, 2021

August 2021 Kent County Month Review

 

 

On August 5, 2021 The Project Coordinator was in Georgetown to submit requisitions for upcoming Kent Community Day. I also disseminated DFFC information to the ACE center in Georgetown De.

 

On August 7, 2021 The Project Coordinator was in New Castle to meet with DFFC IT person to retrieve incoming shirts for Kent leadership team. .

 

On August 12, 2021 Coordinator was in attendance to a FSCAA benefits meeting held virtually on zoom. I also met with DAPI manager in Camden De. to discuss the next school year and DFFC completing 24/7 Dads training with the students.


On August 17, 2021 The Project Coordinator went to Harrington De. to delivery Supplies to a representative from the University of Delaware after school 4H programs.


On August 18, 2021 Project Coordinator completed a training at the ACE center in a effort to market DFFFC to Southern Kent residents.


On August 19, 2021 The Project Coordinator hosted and facilitated the statewide CLC meeting virtually. In attendance were over 25 residents to here and dialogue about DFFC initiatives and promotions throughout the state. 

 

On August 20, 2021 The Project Coordinator attended a meeting with the University of Delaware 4h programs site director in Milford De to discuss the upcoming school year and possible ways for DFFC to partner with their program.


On August 24th The Project Coordinator received supplies from Connections as their contract with PSSF/DFFC has come to a close. Materials were distributed between both New Castle and Kent county in an ongoing effort to keep momentum for DFFC throughout the state.


On August 25, 2021 Project Coordinator was in attendance at the FSCAA Kent County Strong Community Initiative meeting held virtually. At this meeting Kent County resources are shared and communicated to residents and service providers collaborate to assist attendees.


Lastly on August 31, 2021 The Project Coordinator received book bags and supplies for the upcoming Kent County Community day which is to be held on September 4 in collaboration with Expand church. The expectation for this initiative is that over 150 people will be in attendance.

Community Anti-Drug March

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Monday, August 02, 2021

28th Annual Community Anti-Drug
Rally and March

Community Anti-Drug March

Saturday, August 14, 2021 at 11:00 AM

The purpose of this rally and march is to send a positive message to the entire community about
drug free lives and the importance of family (father) involvement in the lives of children.


Richard Allen School
316 South Railroad Avenue
Georgetown, DE 19947

Sussex Co. Power Hour

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Thursday, June 17, 2021

Men's Good Health
Power Hour



Saturday, June 26, 2021 10 AM - 11 AM

Out Train Fitness and Performance
18499 Harbeson Rd.
Milton, De 19968

Tanisha Showell (302) 518-0618, tshowell@connectionscsp.org WWW.DFFCDADS.ORG

The Mental Health of Dads Matters

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Sunday, June 13, 2021

The Mental Health of Dads Matters

Why we need to include fathers in conversations about family wellbeing

By Charles Schaeffer, PhD for Psychology Today

In the last few years, we have taken a big leap in understanding and supporting maternal mental health and family well-being. But when it comes to supporting new fathers, we remain in the Dark Ages. Support for the changes and challenges new fathers face is largely absent from discussions of perinatal and postpartum health. For many men, this means the entry into fatherhood is confusing, painful, and stressful. In fact, some estimates reveal that more than 25 percent of new fathers experience depression in the first year – which is almost always undiagnosed and untreated.

Our lack of support for new dads is a glaring gap in our efforts to improve mental health in families and children. Thankfully a small, emerging group of researchers and clinicians has begun to shed light on the critical changes and challenges that happen to a man and his family when he becomes a father.

Fatherhood is a biological and emotional sea change
Becoming a parent is a major developmental milestone for both men and women. It brings a level of biological, psychological, and relationship changes not seen since puberty. And although health professionals educate many new parents about what these changes look like for a new mom, few people hear about a new father's transition. This is especially true about the biological and hormonal changes that have can have a large impact on a new dad's mood and behavior.

Starting a few months before childbirth, testosterone levels lower as prolactin, vasopressin, and other hormones increase, rewiring a man's brain to prepare him for fatherhood. Entire areas of a man's brain grow and develop in response to hormonal changes in the first year of a child's life, which equip him with crucial skills to care for a newborn. This includes an increased sensitivity to crying, a deeper capacity to bond emotionally, and a greater responsiveness to another's needs. Similar to the adaptive hormonal changes women experience, these shifts also increase a man's chances of experiencing clinical depression or mood disorders.

The psychological impact of parenting
Psychologically, men face some of the toughest developmental challenges they have ever faced as they enter fatherhood. According to Bruce Linton, PhD, founder of Father's Forum, a national organization of support groups for new fathers, the transition to fatherhood involves a series of very difficult psychological tasks. A man is required to resolve his own conflicts concerning his father, negotiate emotional uncertainty, learn to be dependent on others and let others be dependent on him, and find a community with other fathers. None of these tasks is possible without some level of support and understanding.

New fathers also face challenges and changes in the relationship with their partner that few fully anticipate. Suddenly the need to argue, negotiate, and resolve conflicts about parenting takes center stage in their relationship. At the same time, sex and relational satisfaction are not a priority. Many men who have relied on their partners for emotional support and intimacy are now left feeling guilty, resentful, and confused as they try to figure out how to support their partners while sacrificing their own support and need for intimacy.

Facing the fiscal reality of a larger family as well as their spouse's possible (if temporary) departure from the workforce, new fathers also often face a level of stress relating to their work performance and income they haven't experienced since their first job. It's no wonder that one of the biggest relationship changes men (and women) face at this time is the sheer volume of conflict in their relationship.

Involved and supported dads are good fathers
With help and attention from their spouses, fatherhood groups, and preventive mental health treatment (when necessary), new fathers who are struggling can find enhanced meaning, pride, and contentment in tending to their families while learning ways to cope with their own anxieties and doubts.

With this kind of support, fathers are immediately able to reap the emotional benefits when "the love hormone" oxytocin begins to flow through their bodies as they care for, play and interact with their children. A new sense of meaning and satisfaction also quickly arises as fathers begin to teach their children all about the world around them. The first few years are filled with powerful moments in emotional attunement where many men revisit their relationship with vulnerability and emotions as they notice how healing it can be for their children when they hold them, reassure them, and comfort them.

In places such as Sweden, Norway, and Finland where men are given extended paternity leave that is protected by law, researchers have seen big gains in men's confidence and desire to be caregivers, rather than just breadwinners and support personnel.

Involved and supported dads are good for families
Supported and involved dads benefit the whole family. National polls and census data indicate that having a genuine connection with an actively involved father may help protect children from negative life outcomes such as not completing high school or developing behavioral problems. And engaged fathers appear to benefit children in a number of cognitive skills including academic performance, problem solving skills, and intellectual ability.

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New Castle County Family Fun NIGHT

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Wednesday, June 09, 2021

New Castle County FAMILY FUN NIGHT



June 16, 2021, from 6 pm to 9 pm

Guest will be provided with two slices of pizza/ medium drink & 3 hours of Play & Bowling.

Check-in: 5:45 pm at Main Event Lobby to receive your wrist band, and instructions.


Register Below

Main Event Newark
2900 Fashion Center Blvd.
Newark, DE 19720

A Celebration of Fatherhood

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Tuesday, June 01, 2021

Kent County Coalition
A CELBRATION OF FATHERHOOD

Saturday, June 26, 2021,
from 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM



Grotto Pizza
1159 N. Dupont Highway.
Dover, DE 19901

Register Below


More information: Lamont Pierce 302 674-1355 ext.218 or lpierce@firststatecaa.org
WWW.DFFCDADS.ORG

Storytelling Event for National Poetry Month

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Thursday, April 29, 2021

April is National Poetry Month



April is National Poetry Month celebrating the expressiveness and pure delight of bringing words to life through poetry. In partnership with United Way of Delaware, Girl’s Inc., The Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program, and First State Community Action Agency will feature a one-of-a-kind interactive Storytelling opportunity Griot Mama Chomia. Mama Chomia gave an exceptional performance for the students attending Girl’s Inc. Learning Pod on Wednesday, April 21st @ 1:30 pm.


Our goal is to feature Griot Mama Chomia to encourage children to read and write, which research has shown us is critically important to prepare our children for academic excellence. Children who do not read proficiently by third grade are four times more likely to drop out of high school than those who read proficiently. Showing our students, by your example, the joy of reading will help motivate them to celebrate the power of words and create a community of readers. We hope you know how much our community appreciates you!


15 Ways I’m Making Sure My Son Grows Up to Be A Real Man

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Monday, April 26, 2021

15 Ways I’m Making Sure My Son Grows Up to Be A Real Man

My truths for raising a strong, loving, compassionate, caring and empathetic dude.

Father and Son at the Beach



By Ryan Link for Fatherly

It has been more than two years since I first read the Huffington Post blog entry by Justin Ricklefs titled 15 Things all Dads of Daughters Should Know. The 15 things seem like no-brainers when you read them. But in practice, I find it difficult to feel like I am successful in all of those areas on a regular basis. So, I’ve revisited the article every month religiously (I have a monthly reminder set) in an effort to remind myself of the importance of being a positive role model for my daughter, and as a regular check on how I am doing.

While I am still working toward perfecting my role as dad to my daughter, I have been thinking more about what 15 things I should focus on in raising my son as well. After reflecting on my own childhood and the past 10 years of raising my son, I have identified 15 truths for raising a strong, loving, compassionate, caring and empathetic dude.


Teach Him the Power of Love by Telling Him “I Love You” Every Chance You Get

He wants to be loved by you just as much as any daughter. He may shrug it off during his teen years, but he wants to hear it on a regular basis. Our family started saying “I love you” regularly from the beginning (props to my incredible wife for bringing this practice from her family to ours). Now, my son and I rarely end any discussion, phone call or text exchange without those 3 powerful words. Sometimes he says it first, sometimes I do. But it is a regular reminder that our love for one another is there, regardless of the situation, and it is the norm for males to openly express that to each other.


You Are a Direct Influence on How He Acts With Other Boys and Men

He is watching, whether you know it or not. Teach him that everyone on this great planet is equal and deserving of love and respect. Be the man, friend, and partner you want him to become.


As He Grows Up, Go All-In

I did some really stupid things growing up, he will too. There is a fine line between being overbearing and letting him learn from his mistakes. Science tells us that the male brain takes longer to mature than the female brain, this is partially why teenage boys do stupid things. But we should not let this be an excuse. You can be his friend during the teen years, but that should not stand in the way of your being his dad first and foremost.


Treat His Mom Well — He Is Watching

The way you treat his mom will shape how he treats women throughout his life, including his future partner. To paraphrase Justin Ricklefs, “One of the best things you can do for your daughter [or son] is to love [their] mom well.”


Let Your Feelings and Emotions Show, and Show Him It’s Alright to Cry

This one is huge, and I say that from personal experience. I grew up in a very loving family, but somehow I came out as an adult that was not confident in showing his emotions. God bless my wife — when I met her 25 years ago I didn’t have much to say, didn’t voice my own opinions and was emotionless. To this day I wonder what she saw in me. There is still resistance by males in this world to show emotion as if it is some sign of weakness. Steer your son away from this mindset, by all means necessary.


I remember one time my son and I both cried together, initially in sorrow and then in laughter. I am embarrassed to admit that it did happen in a rather stereotypical male way (over the Baltimore Raven’s losing their playoff game in 2012 that sent the Patriots to the Super Bowl). Since then we have seen each other shed tears during movies and other emotional times. It’s not a sign of weakness, but a sign that we are human and we care.


Teach Him How to Stand Up for Others and What Is Right

Now more than ever it is important for him to have confidence in standing up for what is right and to know that his dad supports him. Whether it is standing up for a cause he is passionate about, a friend, his sister, or an innocent bystander. He needs to know that there are certain things that are worth fighting for.


Make As Many Memories As Possible

And they don’t have to occur in a “man cave.”


Make Sure He Knows It’s Not Always About Him

As good citizens and humans, we have the opportunity to make a difference in this world every day. But in the overall scheme of things, we are insignificant — but a speck on the universal time line. He will be remembered not for how cool he thought he was but for the type of person he truly was and how he treated others.


Show Up to His Events (He Will Remember)

To this day I don’t remember the score, opposing team or outcome of the majority of the lacrosse or soccer games I ever played growing up. But I vividly remember glancing to the sideline while I was on the playing field and seeing my dad leaning on the fence cheering me on. The first person a boy looks to for approval and acceptance is his dad — he needs to know that you are paying attention.


Be Present

I still struggle with this, I’m sure I am not the only one. Mobile phones are a daily part of our lives and jobs. Teach yourself to put them away and give him your undivided attention. Do play plenty of non-violent video games with him, but leave your phone somewhere else.


Show Him How to Clean Up Well

Teach him to wash, wear deodorant and brush his teeth properly, every day. There is something to be said for not worrying about this at a young age, but our sons need to know that this is part of being respectful and considerate to others.


Teach Him the Meaning and Importance of Beauty

It is important for him to appreciate the beauty in other people and the world around him. As dads, we need to help our sons understand that beauty is more than just looks. The sooner our sons understand this, the sooner they will shift the paradigm for the better.


Encourage Him to Be Friends With Boys and Girls

Growing up I was never friends with girls — boys were friends, girls were girlfriends. As a result, I was very awkward around girls throughout my school age years. I see this same dynamic play out with boys and girls today. Make sure your son knows how to be friends with girls from a young age and treats them the same as anyone of his boy friends. They could turn out to be the most valuable long-term friendships he has. He will thank you for it one day.


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About DFFC

The Delaware Fatherhood & Family Coalition is an extension of the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program and the Responsible Fatherhood Initiative created specifically to give a voice to fathers and the importance of their involvement for the well-being of their children.


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