Fatherhood and Co-Parenting

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Fatherhood, Co-Parenting and Child Support information. Get a better of understanding of your rights as a parent before you go to court. We will also give you information on how to be a better father and co-parent with the mother. Our goal is to increase father's involvement in the family structure.

Take Your Dad to Breakfast

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Monday, May 07, 2018

Sussex County Delaware Fatherhood & Family Coalition

Take Your Dad to Breakfast


June 16, 2018 from 9AM to Noon

IHOP Restaurant
22812 Sussex Highway, Seaford, DE 19973

Click here to sign-up

FOR MORE INFO: Tanisha Showell (302) 518-0618, tshowell@connectionscsp.org WWW.DFFCDADS.ORG

Strengthening Families and The 5 Protective Factors Series: Parental Resilience

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Sunday, December 18, 2016

Strengthening Families and The 5 Protective Factors Series:

Parental Resilience

Posted by Christopher A. Brown


Strengthening Families™ is a research-informed approach to increase family strengths, enhance child development, and reduce the likelihood of child abuse and neglect. It is based on engaging families, programs, and communities in building five protective factors:

  • Parental resilience
  • Social connections
  • Knowledge of parenting and child development
  • Concrete support in times of need
  • Social and emotional competence of children

Using the Strengthening Families™ framework, more than 30 states are shifting policy and practice to help programs working with children and families focus on protective factors. States apply the Strengthening Families approach in early childhood, child welfare, child abuse prevention, and other child and family serving systems.


Each post includes more detail on each factor than in the brief.

Parental Resilience

Parental resilience is defined by CSSP as “The ability to manage and bounce back from all types of challenges that emerge in every family’s life. It means finding ways to solve problems, building and sustaining trusting relationships including relationships with your own child, and knowing how to seek help when necessary.”

Key to building this resilience is addressing parents’ individual developmental history, psychological resources, and capacity to empathize with self and others. Programs and resources that rely on Attachment Theory create the pro-social connections necessary to develop parental resilience. Because so many parents who abuse and neglect children were abused and neglected themselves, they became parents void of quality intimate relationships with their own parents or caregivers. These parents find it difficult to develop positive attachments to their own children.

Father-specific resources address this factor because fathers who abuse and neglect their children, or who are at risk to abuse and neglect, have unique developmental needs compared to mothers. They moved through a different developmental trajectory. Because many of these fathers lacked involved fathers or positive male role models, they did not develop positive attachments to their fathers and other men. They also did not develop pro-fathering attitudes and values, chief among them attitudes and values associated with healthy masculinity. Masculinity is the primary framework upon which the male psyche is constructed.


How to Avoid Tax Interception due to Child Support

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Monday, November 17, 2014

It’s about that time when all non-custodial parents, who are behind on their child support payments, begin to wonder if they will be getting a refund next year. It’s very disturbing to non-custodial parents when they have tried their best to make payments just to find out that their taxes, either State or Federal, will be intercepted by the Division of Child Support Enforcement. Some may say, “don’t file a refund,” and others may say “pay off your arrears in full”, however the choice is yours to make.

There is a 60 day letter which goes out from the Division of Child Support Enforcement (DCSE) notifying the non-custodial parent that their taxes will be intercepted due to arrears owed. For instance, if the custodial parent is receiving Temporary Assistant for Needed Families (TANF) the amount owed must be at least $150. If the custodial parent is not receiving TANF, the amount owed must be at least $500. However, non-custodial parents can do one of the following to avoid their taxes from being intercepted if done in a timely manner: a) contact your local DCSE agency ; b) Set up a payment arrangement prior to receiving a 60 day letter ; c) request an administrative hearing if you disagree with the amount owed; d) pay arrears in full.

It’s so important to prevent tax interception, if all possible make your child support payments monthly. If there is a change in your circumstances file a child support modification immediately.

By: Ajawavi Ajavon, DAB Mediation Consultant, LLC


About DFFC

The Delaware Fatherhood & Family Coalition is an extension of the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program and the Responsible Fatherhood Initiative created specifically to give a voice to fathers and the importance of their involvement for the well-being of their children.


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