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Fatherhood, Co-Parenting and Child Support information. Get a better of understanding of your rights as a parent before you go to court. We will also give you information on how to be a better father and co-parent with the mother. Our goal is to increase father's involvement in the family structure.

What You Need to Know - New Rule to Increase Regular Child Support Payments

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Saturday, January 07, 2017

What You Need to Know

New Rule to Increase Regular Child Support Payments

Posted by Christopher A. Brown

Many of the noncustodial dads served by organizations and programs like yours struggle to pay child support.

The ability of fathers to pay child support has been an issue in sore need of addressing at the federal and state levels for many years. After all, if a father can’t afford to pay the child support he owes, it has bad consequences for him, his child, and the mother or guardian of his child.

What You Need to Know > New Rule to Increase Regular Child Support Payments.jpg

That’s why a new rule issued by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF)—the federal agency responsible for child support enforcement and partnering with state, tribal, and local child support agencies—has the potential to positively transform the collection of child support across the country. Although some important provisions didn't make it into the final rule that advocates, including National Fatherhood Initiative, say would have made the rule even more transformative, everyone with a stake in creating effective child support enforcement should be optimistic about its potential.

Specifically, according to ACF, this new rule will make state child support enforcement programs more effective, flexible, and family-friendly. It requires state child support agencies to increase their case investigative efforts to ensure that child support orders—the amount noncustodial parents are required to pay each month—reflect the parent’s ability to pay.

The goal of this new rule is to set realistic orders so that noncustodial parents pay regularly, rather than setting an unrealistically high order that results in higher rates of nonpayment. Mark Greenberg, HHS Assistant Secretary for Children and Families, had this to say of the new rule:

“We know from research that when child support orders are set unrealistically high, noncustodial parents are less likely to pay. In fact, several studies say compliance declines when parents are ordered to pay above 15 to 20 percent of their income.”

and “By ensuring states set their orders based on actual circumstances in the family, we believe the rule will result in more reliable child support payments, and children will benefit.”


The new rule updates the child support program by amending existing policy. Here are a few highlights of the new rule:

  • ensure child support obligations are based upon accurate information and the noncustodial parents’ ability to pay
  • increase consistent timely payments to families as well as the number of noncustodial parents supporting their children
  • strengthen procedural fairness
  • improve child support collection rates
  • reduce the accumulation of unpaid and uncollectible child support arrearages
  • incorporate evidence-based standards tested by states that support good customer service
  • increase program efficiency and simplify operational requirements, including standardizing and streamlining payment processing so employers are not unduly burdened
  • incorporate technological advances that support cost-effective management practices and streamlined intergovernmental enforcement
  • prohibit states from excluding incarceration from consideration as a substantial change in circumstances, require states to notify parents of their right to request a review and adjustment of their order if they will be incarcerated for more than six months, and ensure that child support orders for those who are incarcerated reflect the individuals’ circumstances while continuing to allow states significant flexibility in setting orders for incarcerated parents
  • require state child support agencies to make payments directly to a resident parent, legal guardian, or individual designated by the court in order to reign in aggressive and often inappropriate practices of third-party child support collection agencies

Read the rest of article

How to Avoid Tax Interception due to Child Support

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Monday, November 17, 2014

It’s about that time when all non-custodial parents, who are behind on their child support payments, begin to wonder if they will be getting a refund next year. It’s very disturbing to non-custodial parents when they have tried their best to make payments just to find out that their taxes, either State or Federal, will be intercepted by the Division of Child Support Enforcement. Some may say, “don’t file a refund,” and others may say “pay off your arrears in full”, however the choice is yours to make.

There is a 60 day letter which goes out from the Division of Child Support Enforcement (DCSE) notifying the non-custodial parent that their taxes will be intercepted due to arrears owed. For instance, if the custodial parent is receiving Temporary Assistant for Needed Families (TANF) the amount owed must be at least $150. If the custodial parent is not receiving TANF, the amount owed must be at least $500. However, non-custodial parents can do one of the following to avoid their taxes from being intercepted if done in a timely manner: a) contact your local DCSE agency ; b) Set up a payment arrangement prior to receiving a 60 day letter ; c) request an administrative hearing if you disagree with the amount owed; d) pay arrears in full.

It’s so important to prevent tax interception, if all possible make your child support payments monthly. If there is a change in your circumstances file a child support modification immediately.

By: Ajawavi Ajavon, DAB Mediation Consultant, LLC

Anticipation to Delaware Devoted Dad’s Summit

Delaware Fatherhood and Family Coalition - Thursday, October 09, 2014

Anticipation to Delaware Devoted Dad’s Summit

By. Ajawavi Ajavon
DAB Mediation Consultant, LLC.

October, the air is crisp, the leaves are changing and falling of the trees and Halloween is right around the corner. Football is consuming our way of life on Monday and Thursday nights and all day Sunday and then there is DDD (Delaware Devoted Dad’s) Summit, a father for life. The anticipation is mounting, everyone is eager, and gearing up for this phenomenal summit. It will uplift, enlighten, empower, and encourage fathers to build responsible fatherhood, build healthy relationships and build successful parenting skills. Fathers are coming from all over the tri-state area to attend the 5th annual Delaware Devoted Dad’s summit. Fathers will receive information and support at this two day summit that will last a lifetime. This summit will bring an awareness to the community about the importance fatherhood.


Fathers, get ready for this two day adventure in the world of Fatherhood this experience will be invigorating and inspiring. This is your opportunity to ask questions and share ideas about your situation. There will be others who share the same situation and ideas as you. There will be professionals and subject matter experts that can answer your questions or point you in the right direction to get your questions answered. After the summit, Delaware Fatherhood Family Coalition would welcome your comments on this blog or in the comment section on their page. Thanks and enjoy the summit.


About DFFC

The Delaware Fatherhood & Family Coalition is an extension of the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program and the Responsible Fatherhood Initiative created specifically to give a voice to fathers and the importance of their involvement for the well-being of their children.


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